Dublin PubhD 15: Mormons, commuter cyclists and micro-sensors

Our fifteenth event, the first of 2017, 8th February 7:00pm in The Black Sheep’s basement, with three more PhD students presenting their research in 10 minutes:

Hazel O’Brien is final year PhD student studying by distance learning with the University of Exeter. Her research is about how Mormons in Ireland create and maintain their religious identities, focusing on the ways in which they negotiate insider-outsider boundaries in everyday life.

Robert Egan is a PhD candidate in the school of nursing and human sciences in DCU. He is exploring how commuter cyclists deal with matters of responsibility in Dublin, such as managing perceived responsibilities for oneself and for others. Using a grounded theory methodology, he is approaching the subject from the point of view of moral philosophy. At present, he is at the early stages of his research, so, he will be discussing the methodology of grounded theory and the products of his analysis so far.

Sai Pavan Rajesh Sharma Valluru  is an Early Stage Researcher in DCU, studying Micro-Electro-Mechanical-System’s technology based Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor applications in Medical & Aerospace Industries. His work involves design, simulation, and analysis of micro-sensors for gas sensing application using sound waves.

If you are interested in taking part in future events as a speaker, which usually take place on the first Wednesday of the month, please contact us!

Dublin PubhD 15: Mormons, commuter cyclists and micro-sensors

Become the new captain of Dublin PubhD

As many of you may know, I myself am a PhD student at the end of my studies. For a year I was very lucky to have fellow PhD student Kevin Guyan as a co-organiser, but we have since lost Kevin to the bright lights of London! As I finish my PhD and rejoin the real world (aka hopefully acquire gainful employment), I will no longer be able to run Dublin PubhD in 2017.

So there is an opening to become the captain of the good ship Dublin PubhD! I’m happy to continue to support the group through this website, on Meetup, Facebook, and Twitter, as well as giving the new organisers access to all these platforms. In many ways, that hard work of getting the group off the ground and established has been done.

So why take up Dublin PubhD? Not only does it offer experience in event planning, organising, and hosting, you get to meet a whole gamut of fascinating people along the way. For me, meeting so many other PhD students made the experience of doing my own feel less isolated and made me appreciate that all people face the same doubts and worries along the way. You also get to hear about all the wonderful work being done in your own city, as well as encountering people who are excited and interested in the work of the presenters.

I will hold one more Dublin PubhD in February 2017 (I haven’t run the event in December or January), but after that unless a successor has been appointed, that will be the last one. I sincerely hope that someone will be able to take on the group, as it is a worthwhile and valuable thing for both the PhD students and the public.

I can be contacted through Twitter, Facebook, and Meetup. So please share!

Become the new captain of Dublin PubhD

Dublin PubhD 14: Identity and language, Chinese American poetry and citizen curation

Our fourteenth event, 5th October 7:00pm in The Black Sheep’s basement, with three more PhD students presenting their research in 10 minutes:

Fergus O’Dwyer is pursuing a PhD at the School of Languages, Cultures and Linguistics in University College Dublin. He works with members of a Dublin GAA club, using participant observation, free recordings and semi-guided interviews. The general goal is to explore salient identities within this context, and how language can be used to align to these identities.

Meadhbh Hand completed her PhD in the School of English in Trinity College Dublin in 2014.  Her research was a comparative study of Chinese American poet, Li-Young Lee, and Korean American poet, Suji Kwock Kim. Using Walter Mignolo’s theories about border thinking, as well as referring to Gloria Anzaldúa’s Borderlands and Marianne Hirsch’s ideas about postmemory. By exploring the ways in which their work responds to the five themes outlined the study shows both poets to be adept border thinkers whose use of diverse literary sources helps them to assert their identities as Asian American poets.

Rebecca O’Neill is a PhD candidate with the Media & Memory Research Initiative in the School of Arts and New Media. Her research focuses on the current interpretations and applications of the terms curator and curation by those working in cultural institutions and those involved in collective, knowledge building projects. In particular her research looks at Wikipedia as an outlet for potential collaboration, with an emphasis on how this work could be understood as citizen curation, much like citizen science and citizen journalism.

If you are interested in taking part in future events as a speaker, which take place on the first Wednesday of the month, please contact us!

Dublin PubhD 14: Identity and language, Chinese American poetry and citizen curation

Dublin PubhD 13: Grandfathering in Ireland, Spirituality in counselling, and Youth suicide

Our thirteenth event, 7th September 7:00pm in The Black Sheep’s basement, with three more PhD students presenting their research in 10 minutes:

Susan Kent is PhD researcher in the School of Social Work and Social Policy Children’s Research Centre in Trinity College Dublin. Many studies internationally have enquired from grandparents about their role and relationships with their children and grandchildren. Within these studies the role and participation of the grandmother as the main carer is quite visible and that of the grandfather is within a small minority. In an Irish context the voice of the grandfather has not been explore. Therefore, this study is a contribution to enquire and hear what grandfathers in contemporary Ireland feel about grandfathering.

Karen Ward is a PhD researcher in Dublin City University. Her PhD research investigates the meanings of spirituality among accredited counsellors practicing a new energy therapy technique, bringing a spiritual aspect based on shamanic principles into a counselling session which traditionally focuses on the mental and emotional aspects of a clients issue.

Melanie Labor is a PhD candidate with the School of Social Work and Social Policy in
Trinity College Dublin. The aim of this study to get a better understanding of how young people make sense of youth suicide. This is being done by interviewing young people about their individual understandings of youth suicide, taking into account the discourses and practices surrounding youth suicide in young people’s communities that may influence how young people make sense of suicide.

If you are interested in taking part in future events as a speaker, which take place on the first Wednesday of the month, please contact us!

Dublin PubhD 13: Grandfathering in Ireland, Spirituality in counselling, and Youth suicide

Dublin PubhD 12: Solar fuels, ecto-parasites, and retail internationalisation

Our twelfth event, 6th July 7:00pm in The Black Sheep’s basement, with three more PhD students presenting their research in 10 minutes:

Rob Conway-Kenny is a PhD researcher based in the Sami Nasr Institute of Advanced Materials in Trinity College Dublin. His work focuses on the synthesis of novel catalysts for the splitting of water into Hydrogen and Oxygen using only sunlight. Using graphite-like molecular structures,coupled onto metallic elements such as Ruthenium, Iridium and Manganese, electrons can be easily tricked into highly reactive states, and then used to either break or form chemical bonds. Dubbed “Solar Fuels”, these fuels can be used directly to generate electricity, or further manipulated into commercially desirable chemical products.

Orla Murphy is a PhD student with the Department of Optometry in DIT Kevin Street. Her research area is on a common ecto-parasite Demodex that resides in the hair follicles and sebaceous glands of our skin, predominantly on the face. For the purpose of her study she is focussing on Demodex in the eyelash follicles and meibomian glands, looking at how Demodex can cause anterior eye abnormalities including dry eye and testing the effectivity of new market based treatments for killing Demodex.

Alan Morgan is a PhD researcher based in the Dublin Business School. His research will investigate and explore internal brand management within a retail internationalisation context. This represents a significant gap in the retail internationalisation literature. According to Burt & Sparks (2002) there is a growing sophistication in international retail markets that the development of the brand internally within the organisation could and possibly should be viewed as a critical requirement for successful retail internationalisation.

If you are interested in taking part in future events as a speaker, which take place on the first Wednesday of the month, please contact us!

Dublin PubhD 12: Solar fuels, ecto-parasites, and retail internationalisation

Dublin PubhD 11: Fluorescent molecules, Albania and Peatlands

Our eleventh event, 1st June 7:00pm in The Black Sheep, with three more PhD students presenting their research in 10 minutes:

Nitheen Kaperi Sanyal is a final year PhD student in Trinity College Dublin. Her research focusses on designing fluorescent organic molecules towards the detection of explosives like TNT, DNT, Picric acid. Unlike the traditional detection methods like sniffer dogs, metal detectors, she uses the concept of fluorescence quenching to detect these explosives. This method is easy to use, cost-effective, selective and sensitive. It can effectively be used to design cheap robust handheld devices for detecting explosive materials.

Chloe Fagan‘s thesis analyses representations of Albania and Albanians in contemporary German language literature and then subsequently explores the implications these representations have for the Albanian related topics treated of in these texts, such as migration and the Albanian Communist regime and its legacy. The research also compares the manner in which authors of different nationalities (Austrian, Albanian, Serbian, Kosovar) represent both Albania and Albanian related themes in their texts. The thesis aims to highlight an area of German language migrant literature that remains overlooked.

Stephen Barry is a PhD candidate in DIT’s Environmental Sustainability & Health Institute. His research is entitled Process and Policy – A Mechanistic simulation of Carbon Greenhouse Gas Dynamics and Inventories in Irish Upland Mire Dominated CatchmentsPeatlands cover approximately 11,757 Km2 of Ireland and represent a major carbon store – of this nearly half 4,350 km2 is represented by upland blanket peatlands.  Accelerated carbon losses from this land type will have serious consequences for the natural carbon store and its associated impacts on climate change in Ireland. The output of this study will be the development of a spatially referenced mechanistic based account of carbon production, transport and evasion in Irish upland blanket peatlands.

Our June event will be at our new venue, in the basement of the The Black Sheep, 61 Capel Street – look forward to seeing you all then!

If you are interested in taking part in future events as a speaker, which take place on the first Wednesday of the month, please contact us!

Dublin PubhD 11: Fluorescent molecules, Albania and Peatlands

Dublin PubhD 10: Psychological Trauma, Aphasia and Architecture

Our tenth event with three more PhD students presenting their research in 10 minutes:

Rebecca Carr, Centre for European Studies, TCD

Rebecca applies her degrees in psychology and film/literature/drama to answer the question: ‘what is the function of myth in trauma narrative film?’ Using a selection of films from Central and Southeastern Europe, her research argues that myth, as a narrative, is ever-evolving but essential to healing psychological trauma. Upon completion of her studies, Rebecca hopes to use film as a tool to work with displaced individuals and groups.

Analisa Marie Pais, School of Linguistic, Speech and Communication Sciences, TCD

Analisa’s research explores aphasia, a term used to describe a language/ communication disorder that commonly results from damage to those areas of the brain that control language (most often the left hemisphere of the brain). Her presentation will discuss the possible benefits of Conversation Partner Training (CPT) for people living with aphasia within the context of India. CPT enables communicative access to conversations and enhances life participation through training those around the individual with aphasia. It is an approach which recognises that the competence of a person with aphasia is typically masked by the language impairment, and that when conversation partners implement the use of appropriate techniques, people with aphasia can engage successfully.

Kieran Gaya, Art History and Cultural Policy, UCD

Kieran is studying how the language of architecture and urban design were used as instruments towards the generation of civil or national identity in Pakistan. He is looking at Islamabad as a venue of transnational design by architects from Greece, the US, Italy and Turkey. The name of the city is indicative of the intention to make it clear that the new country of Pakistan, established in 1947, was to be a new home for the displaced Muslims coming in from all over now independent British India.

Our May event will be at our new venue, upstairs in Against the Grain, 11 Wexford Street – look forward to seeing you all then!

If you are interested in taking part in future events as a speaker, which take place on the first Wednesday of the month, please contact us!

Dublin PubhD 10: Psychological Trauma, Aphasia and Architecture

Dublin PubhD 9: Social emotional learning, Autostereoscopy, and Preeclampsia

Our ninth event with three more PhD students presenting their research in 10 minutes:

Norah Sweetman started work as a Montessori teacher and has taught in schools, colleges, in home tuition and in Youthreach where she designed the social skills programmes. The high incidence of domestic violence in the lives of those families and their children prompted her current doctoral research into the effects of domestic violence on young people’s social emotional learning (SEL). The research concerns the effects on of domestic violence on the SEL of young people. It was an active intervention called “up2talk” that sought to improve SEL skills.

Inbarasan Muniraj is a PhD student in University College Dublin and working towards the advancement of 3D auto-stereoscopic (glasses free) visualization and display. His research interests are in the areas of Photon-limited 3D imaging, visualization and optical and digital cryptography.

Paulina Szklanna is a PhD student in UCD SPHERE research group. Her work focuses on preeclampsia (pregnancy disorder), looking at platelets and their involvement in this disease trying to find diagnostic or a prognostic biomarker for preeclampsia with the use of platelets. Once a marker is identified it will then be easier to devise a simple blood test that will help us diagnose preeclampsia much earlier. Novel ways of diagnosing preeclampsia are necessary as current methods were constructed in the 18th century.

We will be in our new venue, upstairs in Against the Grain -look forward to seeing you all then!

If you are interested in taking part in future events as a speaker, which take place on the first Wednesday of the month, please contact us!

Dublin PubhD 9: Social emotional learning, Autostereoscopy, and Preeclampsia

Dublin PubhD 8: Plasma Physics, Patient Preferences, and Physiotherapy

Our eighth event with three more PhD students presenting their research in 10 minutes:

James Creel is a PhD student in Trinity, who’s research centres around plasma physics; in particular, the manipulation of laser produced plasma. His current work involves plasma heating via inductive coupling (think wireless charging) to increasing light output of plasma for material identification.

Bridget Johnston is a research assistant and PhD candidate in the Centre for Health Policy and Management. Her thesis is focused on examining patients’ and caregivers’ preferences for services and supports near the end of life, by using a discrete choice experiment – a survey tool that measures the relative value people place on attributes of care by asking them to make trade offs between hypothetical scenarios.

Mary Walsh is in the final year of a PhD in Physiotherapy in the Royal College of Surgeons Ireland. Her research explores the risk of falling among people who go home from hospital after experiencing a stroke. She aims to inform how physiotherapists think about this problem by drawing from both statistical prediction methods and the experiences of people who have had multiple falls in the year following their stroke.

We look forward to seeing you all in the basement of the Stag’s Head (1 Dame Court, Dublin 2) on Wednesday 3 February at 6.30pm.

If you are interested in taking part in future events as a speaker, which take place on the first Wednesday of the month, please contact us!

Dublin PubhD 8: Plasma Physics, Patient Preferences, and Physiotherapy

Dublin PubhD 7: Citizenship, the Leaving Cert, and Influenza A

Our seventh event with three more PhD students presenting their research in 10 minutes:

Bashir Otukoya is a PhD student at the UCD Sutherland School of Law. His research involves an exploration of the legal process of citizenship by naturalisation, with the aim of addressing the impact of citizenship on naturalised citizens perception of “Irishness”. It seeks to determine the role of citizenship in the social integration of immigrants in Ireland.

Denise Burns is a PhD student in the School of Education, Trinity College, Dublin. Her research examines the belief that all 23 subjects on the Leaving Cert curriculum are “It’s all rote learning and memory recall!”

Kieran Dee is studying the transmission of the Influenza A virus in Trinity College. The aim of his project is to attempt to identify any beneficial gain that influenza viruses may have by adopting this elongated particle type. Recent studies have correlated the elongated form of influenza with increased transmissibility of the virus, so this is currently where he is focusing his research.

We look forward to seeing you all in the basement of the Stag’s Head (1 Dame Court, Dublin 2) on Wednesday 11 November at 6.30pm.

If you are interested in taking part in future events as a speaker, which take place on the first Wednesday of the month, please contact us!

Dublin PubhD 7: Citizenship, the Leaving Cert, and Influenza A