Dublin PubhD 25 – Radiotherapy, Cooking and Entrepreneurship

Our 25th event will take place on the 6th December at 7:00 pm upstairs in the Doyle’s Bar (9 College St, Dublin 2, Dublin) near Trinity College Dublin. Our three speakers for the evening are:

Amy Buckley is a PhD Student at the Department of Surgery, at Trinity College Dublin. Her research aims to develop new radiotherapy models.

JJ Healy is a lecturer in Culinary Arts in CIT Cork and is in the closing stages of his PhD. He has worked as a professional chef for 30 years, spending the last 8 years lecturing. His research is looking to create a Framework of Critical Success Factors for Independent Restaurants.

Gavan Cleary is a 2nd year PhD student in DIT. A mature student and late convert to academia, Gavan spent over 25 years in sales and management before deciding to change careers. He graduated with a H.Dip. (Hons) in Cloud and Web Technologies from DBS in 2014. He then continued his education obtaining an M.Sc. in Innovation and Technology Management from DIT in 2015. His research is focused on developing practical toolkits to support social entrepreneurs as they create new social enterprises in Ireland.

Looking forward to seeing you all there. And as always, if you are interested in taking part in future events as a speaker, which usually take place on the first Wednesday of the month, please contact us at dublin@pubhd.org!

 

Dublin PubhD 25 – Radiotherapy, Cooking and Entrepreneurship

Dublin PubhD 24 – Lung cancer, Irish Genetics & Samhain

Dublin PubhD 24 – Lung cancer, Irish Genetics & Samhain

Our 24th event will take place on the 1st November at 7:00 pm upstairs in Doyle’s Bar (9 College St, Dublin 2, Dublin) near Trinity College Dublin.

Martin Barr is a Clinical Scientist in the Thoracic Oncology Research Group, Institute of Molecular Medicine, St James’s Hospital & is an Adjunct Assistant Professor in Trinity College Dublin. Martin has a number of key research interests in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). These include projects investigating the role of VEGF and its receptors in lung cancer cell signalling, miRNA profiling and gene signatures as potential markers in the treatment of lung cancer patients and the role of VEGF on lung cancer cell survival.

Edmund Gilbert is a third year PhD student at the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. His PhD is on the subject of Irish population genetics and diversity, i.e. the how and why different regions in Ireland show different genetic profiles. His work involves studying the wider Irish population, as well as the Irish Travellers who are an interesting genetic isolate.

Allison Galbari is a first-year PhD student at UCD, studying archaeology. Her research focuses on the origins of the festival of Samhain and its eventual evolution into Halloween. Due to the intangible nature of this festival, it is difficult to use traditional archaeological methods to conduct this study. By using folklore, we can get a better understanding of how people viewed the world around them, including archaeological sites. By utilizing the folklore, we will be able to track locations that were either directly associated with Samhain through oral tradition or locations that had significant Halloween traditions, suggesting a traditional importance.

Looking forward to seeing you all there. And as always, if you are interested in taking part in future events as a speaker, which usually take place on the first Wednesday of the month, please contact us at dublin@pubhd.org!

Dublin PubhD 24 – Lung cancer, Irish Genetics & Samhain

Dublin PubhD 23 – Making Decisions, Migrant Integration & Muscle Metabolism

Dublin PubhD 23 – Making Decisions, Migrant Integration & Muscle Metabolism

Our 23rd event will take place on the 4th October at 7:00 pm in The Pavilion Bar’s balcony in Trinity College Dublin, with three more guests presenting their research in 10 minutes.

Niamh Clarke graduated with a B.Sc. (Hons) in Nutraceuticals in Health and Nutrition from DIT in 2012. Upon completion of her undergraduate degree she continued her education obtaining an M.Sc.in Healthcare Infection Management at Trinity College Dublin. Her research area focused on antimicrobial resistance and serotyping of Group B Streptococcus isolates from adult and neonatal populations. Niamh has worked as a Research Coordinator in The Trinity Academic Dept. Surgery at St. James’s Hospital Dublin for the past four years. Niamh coordinates studies between TCD & SJH in the area of GI Inflammatory Diseases and Cancers, working closely with multidisciplinary teams and patients alike. A large part of Niamh’s work is managing various biobanks at the Trinity Translational Medicine Institute, which are utilised for national and international translational research projects. She is an active member of the NSAI National Mirror Committee for ISO 20387- Biotechnology. Niamh is a great patient advocate and is driving Public Patient Involvement (PPI) in the Dept. Surgery. She sits on the National Clinical Research PPI Working Group (CR-PPI-WG), working to increase meaningful public and patient involvement in research. She is passionate about science communication and outreach, organising many school talks and workshops for children.

Bradley Good is a first year PhD student at the Irish School of Ecumenics in Trinity College Dublin. His research is at the intersection of migrant/refugee integration and adult education. Specifically, he is interested in two-way models of integration, that focus on both migrants and Irish citizens.

R. Sambhavi Priyadarshini is a second year PhD student in the school of Health and Human Performance at Dublin City University. Her research revolves around the relationship between changes intra-organelle calcium signaling and muscular metabolism in responses to stresses such as exercise training or inactivity.

Looking forward to seeing you all there. And as always, if you are interested in taking part in future events as a speaker, which usually take place on the first Wednesday of the month, please contact us at dublin@pubhd.org!

Dublin PubhD 23 – Making Decisions, Migrant Integration & Muscle Metabolism

Dublin PubhD 22 – Brain Hijacking, Nanomedicine & English Literature

Dublin PubhD 22 – Brain Hijacking, Nanomedicine & English Literature

Our 21st event will take place on the 6th September at 7:00 pm in The Pavilion Bar’s balcony in Trinity College Dublin, with three more guests presenting their research in 10 minutes.

Diego Garaialde is a first year Ph.D. student in UCD. He’s studied motivation since his Psychology Undergraduate in DCU and his Cognitive Science Masters in UCD. The Ph.D. is focusing on how incentives can be used to change habits and promote learning, specifically for online courses. Current approaches to motivation focus on creating goals and fighting against your natural urges through sheer will and discipline. Diego hopes that his research on incentives can help us understand how to train the brain so these natural urges align with personal goals, making the whole process easier. His research involves an amalgamation of theories from psychology, cognitive science, and human-computer interaction. The Ph.D. is funded by the NUI Travelling Studentship and will involve trips to Birmingham, London, and San Francisco.

Dr. Adriele Prina-Mello, Assistant Professor in Translational Nanomedicine, has a research group focused on the translation of nanotechnology-tools, nanomaterials, their multifunctional solutions, devices and instrumentation applications into the medical research area as Nanomedicine tools for next generation medical practice.

Marie Egan is a 3rd year Ph.D. student in DCU’s Department of English. Her research is focused Frances Burney (1752-1840) the prolific writer and journal keeper-a very successful novelist, whose novels and dramas reflect her own ambivalence towards her identity as a writer and her ongoing negotiations with the demands of propriety. Burney’s negotiations and compromises with the demands of family and society are the focus of Marie’s research.

Looking forward to seeing you all there. And as always, if you are interested in taking part in future events as a speaker, which usually take place on the first Wednesday of the month, please contact us at dublin@pubhd.org!

Dublin PubhD 22 – Brain Hijacking, Nanomedicine & English Literature

Dublin PubhD 21 – Ancient Empires, Novel Drugs & Mind Imaging Lie Detectors

Dublin PubhD 21 – Ancient Empires, Novel Drugs & Mind Imaging Lie Detectors

Our 21st event will take place on the 2nd August at 7:00pm in The Pavilion Bar’s balcony in Trinity College Dublin, with three more guests presenting their research in 10 minutes.

Ronan Stewart graduated with his Master’s degree in South Asian studies from the University of Cambridge in 2012. His work was on the fall of the Hindu Vijayanagara civilisation in 1565, and involved exploring three different literary traditions, with Islamic, Western and Hindu accounts all working through this. He aims for a balanced and informed dialogue about history and how it informs the present, especially as it informs the Muslim world and assists the rise of violent Islamist groups like ISIS. He has conducted lectures about this topic with University College Dublin and sports against racism Ireland. These issues can range from the treatment of minorities in Muslim countries, gender issues, how Muslims approach crime and so on. This involves tackling historical myths which pervade our society and help push forward nationalistic, religious or other ideologies which can cause conflict. Myths include the notion of a poverty-free Islamic caliphate, the return to a totally moral past, or a past which was free of religious discord. Ultimately this discussion is about what kind of society we want to live in.

Jacintha O’Sullivan is a Professor in Translational Oncology, based at the Trinity Translational Medicine Institute, St. James’s Hospital. Currently, she also directs a translational gastrointestinal research team in the Trinity Translational Medicine Institute in collaboration with clinical and surgical colleagues. Her research interests elucidating how the tumor microenvironment cross talks to the immune system in gastrointestinal patients and the importance of metabolism, inflammation, and obesity in driving disease progression and in regulating treatment response. Her research group also focuses on the development of diagnostics platforms and novel patented therapeutics to detect and treat gastrointestinal cancer patients.

Laura McGrady is a first year PhD student in DCU.Her research is being undertaken in the interesting discipline of Neuropsychology and law. It falls under the category of Neurolaw. Recent developments in modern brain imagining technology have many implications for  criminal investigation, the justice system and sentencing protocols. Her research is specifically concerned with the use of EEG technology for polygraph purposes and its admissibility in the court of law. I am currently developing a hybrid of two popular lie detector tests that are designed to record and measure the brain wave involved in memory recognition to determine if the examinee is concealing important or crime relevant information.

Looking forward to seeing you all there. And as always, if you are interested in taking part in future events as a speaker, which usually take place on the first Wednesday of the month, please contact us at dublin@pubhd.org!

Dublin PubhD 21 – Ancient Empires, Novel Drugs & Mind Imaging Lie Detectors

Dublin PubhD 20 – VR-Education, Black Magic AI & Stem Cells

Dublin PubhD 20 – VR-Education, Black Magic AI & Stem Cells

Our 20th event 5th July at 7 pm in The Pavilion Bar’s balcony in Trinity College Dublin, with three more guests presenting their research in 10 minutes.

Simon Creane is a second year full-time Ph.D. student at STEM, Institute of Education, DCU. His research involves the design and development of a virtual and augmented reality learning environment to support inquiry learning.

Jim O’ Donoghue from Insight in DCU, has just defended his Ph.D. dissertation. His research focused on developing tools to manage and interpret AI experiments, thus mitigating some of the black magic therein.

Michael Monaghan is an Ussher Assistant Professor in Biomedical Engineering at Trinity College Dublin. He has published a number of key papers in the field of human valvulogenesis, embryonic stem cell research, cardiomyocyte differentiation, biomaterials and non-invasive optical characterization. He will present his research on “Convincing stem cells to do your bidding”.

Looking forward to seeing you all there. And as always, if you are interested in taking part in future events as a speaker, which usually take place on the first Wednesday of the month, please contact us at dublin@pubhd.org!

Dublin PubhD 20 – VR-Education, Black Magic AI & Stem Cells

Dublin PubhD 19 – Lie Detectors, Stubborn Cancers and Neuroimaging

Our nineteenth event 7th June May at 7:00pm in The Black Sheep’s basement, with three more PhD students presenting their research in 10 minutes. Our three speakers are confirmed:

Joanne Kenney recently completed her PhD in NUIG. Her research focuses on neuroimaging in psychiatry. Many individuals diagnosed with psychosis have impaired cognitive abilities such as impaired learning and memory, attention, social skills and problem solving. These difficulties with cognition can greatly affect their everyday functioning such as having problems in education, finding employment and meaningful relationships. Using magnetic resonance imaging, my research investigates brain images of people who were diagnosed with a psychotic condition to see if there are any subtle abnormalities in the structures of their brains, compared to psychiatrically healthy individuals, which contribute to these cognitive difficulties.

Laura McGrady is a first year PhD student in DCU.Her research is being undertaken in the interesting discipline of Neuropsychology and law. It falls under the category of Neurolaw. Recent developments in modern brain imagining technology have many implications for  criminal investigation, the justice system and sentencing protocols. Her research is specifically concerned with the use of EEG technology for polygraph purposes and its admissibility in the court of law. I am currently developing a hybrid of two popular lie detector tests that are designed to record and measure the brain wave involved in memory recognition to determine if the examinee is concealing important or crime relevant information.

Stephen Maher recently re-joined Trintiy College Dublin as the James Ussher Assistant Professor in Translational Oncology. Stephen is a translational cancer biologist with the Department of Surgery, who works closely with cancer patients at St James’s Hospital. Most cancer patients will receive either chemotherapy, or radiotherapy, or both, to treat their disease. His research focuses on understanding the biology of cancer, and why some patients tumours respond very well to these treatments while others do not. Over the past few years a major focus of his research has examined genetic regulation of sensitivity to treatment, how damage to the genetic material inside tumour cells influences their sensitivity to chemotherapy and radiation, and how we are using this information to use re-engineer resistant tumours to become more sensitive to treatment.

Looking forward to seeing you all there. And as always, if you are interested in taking part in future events as a speaker, which usually take place on the first Wednesday of the month, please contact us at dublin@pubhd.org!

Dublin PubhD 19 – Lie Detectors, Stubborn Cancers and Neuroimaging

Dublin PubhD 18: Dublin PubhD 18 – Behaviour-changing bugs, Fluorescent Surgery and Imperial Fiction

Our eighteenth event will be on the 3rd May at 7:00pm in The Black Sheep’s basement (61, Capel Street), with so far two confirmed speaker her research in 10 minutes:

Maureen Williams is a third year PhD student in the Zoology Department at Trinity College. She focuses on how behavior-changing parasites and their hosts interact, and how those interactions could change with rising temperature. She conducts experiments and do field work mostly in lakes and rivers, with a focus on ecologically important crustaceans and their Acanthocephalan parasites. Hopefully, her work will be able to show the ecological consequences of parasites pushing hosts to their predators. She tweets as @MoDubs11 and you can read more about her on her website.

Scott McKay is a first year PhD student in the Department of Pharmaceutical and Medicinal Chemistry at the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. His research focuses on the application of quantum mechanics and computational chemistry to the design and development of drug molecules for use in fluorescence guided surgery and photodynamic therapy.

Patrick Rogers is a first year PhD student in DCU’s School of English, is writing his thesis on Space and time in imperial boys fiction. He is discussing how boys fiction was written specifically to develop the empire builders of the future. This includes issues on the establishment of boundaries and the idea of progress vs the degenerated or primitive culture me of other territories within the empire.

Looking forward to seeing you all there. And as always, if you are interested in taking part in future events as a speaker, which usually take place on the first Wednesday of the month, please contact us at dublin@pubhd.org!

Dublin PubhD 18: Dublin PubhD 18 – Behaviour-changing bugs, Fluorescent Surgery and Imperial Fiction

Dublin PubhD 17: Solar flares, Modelling Novels and Biofeedback

Our seventeenth event on the 5th April at 7:00pm in The Black Sheep’s basement, with three more PhD students presenting their research in 10 minutes:

Laura Hayes is a third year PhD student working with the Astrophysics Research Group at Trinity College Dublin. Her research focuses on the physics of our closest star – the Sun – and its magnetic activity. Solar flares are huge explosions of electromagnetic energy on the Sun which result from powerful magnetic fields that get too tangled and twisted. The intense radiation produced from a flare can cause adverse space weather effects on telecommunication, GPS and power systems, and so the understanding and prediction of flares is very important. Her work looks at the X-ray emission from solar flare events using spacecraft such as NASAs RHESSI mission together with other space based and ground observations to identify and classify the highly variable nature of solar flares. Twitter: @laura_hayess

Sara J Kerr is a third year PhD researcher working at An Foras Feasa, Maynooth University. Her research is in the field of Digital Humanities which bridges the gap between STEM and Arts, and specifically focuses on the application of vector space models to 19th century literature using R programming. Vector space models, which include topic models and word embeddings, represent relationships between texts and words as series of numbers which allow alternative readings of the texts. Her work uses these models to examine the theme of independence in the novels of Jane Austen, Maria Edgeworth and Sydney Owenson. She tweets as @data_fiend. Her thesis title is – “Rational Creatures”: Examining independence through vector space models in Austen, Edgeworth, and Owenson 1800–1820. She twits as @data_friend

Louise Brennan is a first year PhD student in the Insight Centre for Data Analytics at UCD and is part of CATCH ITN – a European research group focused on how connected health can improve quality of life in cancer survivors. Her research focuses on the use of biofeedback during rehabilitation exercises for women undergoing surgery for breast cancer. She aims to look at how movement sensors can improve exercise technique and adherence, and how this can be incorporated into a mobile app for home rehabilitation. She twits as @Louise_Brennan_.

Looking forward to seeing you all there. And as always, if you are interested in taking part in future events as a speaker, which usually take place on the first Wednesday of the month, please contact us at dublin@pubhd.org!

 

 

Dublin PubhD 17: Solar flares, Modelling Novels and Biofeedback

Dublin PubhD 16: Mars rocks, machine translation, digital ethics

Our sixteenth event 1st March 7:00pm in The Black Sheep’s basement, with three more PhD students presenting their research in 10 minutes:

Ankit Verma is third year Ph.D. student in the Department of Geography, Trinity College Dublin. He is investigating the effect of the asteroid and comet impacts on rock breakdown on Earth and Mars. Ankit does his field work at Meteor Crater in Arizona where he collects data on weathering of impacted and non-impacted rocks. He analyses his samples in the Natural History Museum in London. He uses these rock samples in simulated weathering experiments in conditions similar to Earth and Mars at Oxford Rock Breakdown Laboratory, UK.

Aaron Han is a first year PhD student in ADAPT Centre (adaptcentre.ie) based in DCU. His PhD topic is Machine Translation (MT). He will talk about how MT works, how MT serves our society and how you are connected with MT everyday. His page: (https://aaronlifenghan.jimdo.com/news/) and network: (https://www.linkedin.com/in/aaronhan/)

Wessel Reijers is a second year PhD student in the ADAPT Centre based in DCU. He is studying ethics of digital content technologies, working with industry partners to create ground-breaking digital content innovations. Wessel started an initiative called Free Academia to discuss issues of academia such as the publish or perish culture. www.freeacademia.eu

If you are interested in taking part in future events as a speaker, which usually take place on the first Wednesday of the month, please contact us!

Dublin PubhD 16: Mars rocks, machine translation, digital ethics